New

Euphorbia alluaudii (Cat Tails Euphorbia)

Euphorbia alluaudii (Cat Tails Euphorbia)


Scientific Name

Euphorbia alluaudii Drake

Common Names

Cat Tails Euphorbia, Sausage Tree, Stick Euphorbia, Yellow-leaf Bush Euphorbia, Milk Bush, Pencil Tree, Stick Cactus, Stick Plant

Synonyms

Euphorbia alluaudii subsp. alluaudii, Euphorbia leucodendron, Tirucalia alluaudii

Scientific Classification

Family: Euphorbiaceae
Subfamily: Euphorbioideae
Tribe: Euphorbieae
Subtribe: Euphorbiinae
Genus: Euphorbia

Description

Euphorbia alluaudii, also known as Euphorbia leucodendron, is a spineless succulent shrub with narrow, pale green, cylindrical, jointed stems, first erect then arch outwards to form a mass as wide as tall. It grows up to 12 feet (3.6 m) tall. In summer, the stems are tipped with many green, up to 0.5 inches (1.3 cm) long leaves. They are dotted with brown marks where the leaves were previously attached. At stem tips in spring and summer appear tiny yellow-green flower structures (cyathia) that hold the even smaller flowers. The fruits are red and somewhat heart-shaped.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zone 9a to 11b: from 20 °F (−6.7 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Euphorbias are very easy to care for. They require a little pampering to become established, but once they are, they are self-sufficient. In fact, more die from too much care and watering than from neglect. Euphorbias need well-draining soil and lots of sunlight. They are not particular about soil pH, but they cannot tolerate wet soil. Unlike most succulents, Euphorbia does not handle long periods of drought well. It may need weekly watering during the summer. Water whenever the soil is dry several inches below the surface. Water deeply, but don't let them sit in wet soil, which can cause root rot. Add some organic matter or fertilizer to the planting hole. If you are growing them in containers or your soil is poor, feed with a half-strength fertilizer monthly.

Euphorbia can be grown from seed, but they can be difficult to germinate (or even find). It is usually propagated by cuttings. This can be tricky because of the exuding sap. Rooting hormone is recommended with Euphorbias. They tend to grow problem-free, but there are a few pests and diseases to be alert for. See more at How to Grow and Care for Euphorbia.

Origin

Native to Madagascar.

Links

  • Back to genus Euphorbia
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

Photo Gallery


Subscribe now and be up to date with our latest news and updates.





Euphorbia alluaudii (Cat Tails Euphorbia) - garden

Accepted Scientific Name: Euphorbia alluaudii Drake
Bull. Mus. Hist. Nat. (Paris) 9: 43 1903

Origin and Habitat: Garden origin (Nursery produced cultivar). The original natural habitat of this species are the warmer areas of South-west Madagascar, extending towards the central high-plateau: Androy Andrahomana Ambovombe (Tsimananada).

Description: Euphorbia alluaudii (Cat Tails Euphorbia) is a dioecious (exceptionnaly monoecious) succulent shrub or small tree made up of clusters of cylindrical, jointed, spineless branches. Most of its branches rise erectly from the base and then arch outwards to form a mass as wide as tall. It can ultimately reach to 4(-6) metres though in containers it more commonly grows to a modest 1.2-1.8 metres tall.
crested dorm: The beautiful crested form (Euphorbia alluaudii f. criatata) is rare in collection and highly priced for its sculptural shape and glossy green epidermis. The crested form can also get very big making a spectacular specimen.
Stems: Fan shaped forming odd sculptural, pale green to bright green. There are several crested clones ofEuphorbia alluaudii and all have the tendency to fan out, some will form stable crests while others (the more common) just cluster over one another. The stems are dotted with brown marks where the leaves were previously attached and also have some relatively large stoma or pores that give them a somewhat speckled appearance. Massive quantities of sap are poured out when a stem is cut. The sap quickly seals and protects the cut surface making subsequent fungal growth less likely.
Leaves: Tiny, green, reduced to scales at near the growing tips on new branches, but they quickly fall off. The stipules form a black glandular ring around the leaf insertion.
Inflorescence: Lateral at the apex of the twigs, cyathophylls identical to incyathescence bracts.
Flowers (cyathia): Always unisexual, dichasial branching of incyathescences (male cyathia are usually more numerous). Nectar glands 5.
Fruits (Capsules): Dehiscent, always erect, trilocular, green thin and smooth, with ridges tinted with purple, 3 seeds per capsule.
Seeds: Testa smooth, ecarunculate.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Euphorbia alluaudii group

  • Euphorbia alluaudii" href='/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Euphorbiaceae/27008/Euphorbia_alluaudii'> Euphorbia alluaudii Drake : Shrub or small tree with, virgate, cylindrical branches, procumbent from the base. Distribution: South-west Madagascar, extending towards the central high-plateau.
  • Euphorbia alluaudii f. criatata" href='/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Euphorbiaceae/27014/Euphorbia_alluaudii_f._criatata'> Euphorbia alluaudii f. criatata hort. : Crested form.
  • Euphorbia alluaudii subs. oncoclada (Drake) F.Friedmann & Cremers : has thicker sausage-like joints about 2,5 cm wide with prominent leaf scars. Distribution: Tulear/Saint-Augustin region.

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) Hermann Jacobsen “Abromeitiella to Euphorbia” Blandford Press, 1960
2) James Cullen, Sabina G. Knees, H. Suzanne Cubey “The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants: A Manual for the Identification of Plants Cultivated in Europe, Both Out-of-Doors and Under Glass” Cambridge University Press, 11/ago/2011
3) Hermann Jacobsen “A handbook of succulent plants: descriptions, synonyms, and cultural details for succulents other than Cactaceae” Volume 1 Blandford Press, 1960
4) Hermann Jacobsen “Lexicon of Succulent Plants” Littlehampton Book Services Ltd. 1975
5) Urs Eggli “Illustrated Handbook of Succulent Plants: Dicotyledons” Springer, 2002
6) The Euphorbia Journal 3: 26 1985
7) Buddensiek, V. “Sukkulente Euphorbien.” 1–176 1998
8) Cremers, G. “Les euphorbes coralliformes de Madagascar.” Bull. Jard. Bot. Belg. 54: 23–64.1984
9) Drake del Castillo, E. “Note sur les plantes recueillies par M. Guillaume Grandidier, dans le Sud de Madagascar, en 1898 et 1901.” in: Bull. Mus. Hist. Nat. (Paris) 9: 35–46, 96–99. 1903
10) Friedmann, F. & G. Cremers. “Observations sur les euphorbes coralliformes de Madagascar.” in: Adansonia, n.s. 16(2): 245–257.1976
11) Palacky, J. “Cat. Pl. Madagasc.” Prague. 4 fasc.1906-1907.
12) Schatz, G. E., S. Andriambololonera, Andrianarivelo, M. W. Callmander, Faranirina, P. P. Lowry, P. B. Phillipson, Rabarimanarivo, J. I. Raharilala, Rajaonary, Rakotonirina, R. H. Ramananjanahary, B. Ramandimbisoa, A. Randrianasolo, N Ravololomanana, Z. S. Rogers, C. M. Taylor & G. A. Wahlert. “Catalogue of the Vascular Plants of Madagascar.” Monogr. Syst. Bot. Missouri Bot. Gard. 0(0): 0–0. 2011
13) Haevermans, T. 2004. Euphorbia alluaudii. In: IUCN 2013. “IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.” Version 2013.2. . Downloaded on 30 April 2014.
14) Euphorbia alluaudii. Available from Tolkin (http://app.tolkin.org/projects/72/taxa). Downloaded on 30 April 2014.
15) Barres, L., Vilatersana, R., Molero, J., Susanna, A., and Galbany-Casals, M. "Molecular phylogeny of Euphorbia subgen. Esula sect. Aphyllis (Euphorbiaceae) inferred from nrDNA and cpDNA markers." in: Taxon 60, 705–720. 2011
16) Bruyns, P.V., Klak, C., and Hanacek, P. “Age and diversity in Old World succulent species of Euphorbia (Euphorbiaceae).” in: Taxon 60(6), 1717–1733. 2011
17) Dorsey, B.L., Haevermans, T., Aubriot, X., Morawetz, J.J., Riina, R., Steinmann, V.W., and Berry, P.E. “Phylogenetics, morphological evolution, and classification of Euphorbia subgenus Euphorbia.” in Taxon 62, 291–315. 2013
18) Steinmann, V., and Porter, M. “Phylogenetic relationships in Euphorbieae (Euphorbiaceae) based on ITS and ndhF sequence data.” in: Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 89, 453-490. 2002


Euphorbia alluaudii f. criatata Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli

Send a photo of this plant.

The gallery now contains thousands of pictures, however it is possible to do even more. We are, of course, seeking photos of species not yet shown in the gallery but not only that, we are also looking for better pictures than those already present. Read More.

Cultivation and Propagation: It need bright light to partial shade for best appearance. It responds well to warmth, with its active growth period in the late spring and summer months. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch during active growing season (more than once a week during hot weather) In the winter months, waterigs should be suspended or restricted to once over the winter. The most common failure in growing this plant is over watering, especially during the winter months. Likes porous soil with adequate drainage.
Propagation: It is propagated by cuttings or graft, and are generally grafted for convenience on Euphorbia canariensis or Euphorbia resinifera.
It is recommend taking Euphorbia cuttings in Spring/Summer when the plant is growing so that they have a better chance of success. They key is heat & good air circulation. These cuttings should be dipped in Hormone powder (but it is not needed) and left for a period of 3-4 weeks to callous. Then pot the cutting and don't water ( or kept slightly moist) until rooted. These will root just fine, if you can put the pot outside in the summer, or put pot on a heating pad.
Crested growth: Unlike 'monstrose' varieties of plants, where the variation from normal growth is due to genetic mutation, crested growth can occur on normal plants. Sometimes it's due to variances in light intensity, or damage, but generally the causes are unknown. A crested plant may have some areas growing normally, and a cresting plant that looks like a brain, may revert to normal growth for no apparent reason. If you have any of the crested part left you need to remove the normal growth and leave the crested part behind this will need to be done regularly.
Hardiness: Considered frost tender like all Madagascan Euphorbias, but surprisingly cold hardy outdoors and also very sun hardy for a crested plant.
It likes warmth (recommended minimum winter temperature 10°-15° C) however plants kept perfectly dry can can survive low temperatures, approx. 2° C, but for safe cultivation it is best to avoid freezing temperatures. Never let the roots chill.
Warning: As with all other Euphorbias when a plant get damaged it exudes a thick white milky sap known as latex. This latex is poisonous and particularly dangerous for the eyes, skin and mucous membranes. So pay extreme attention not to get any in your eyes or mouth. Cultivated plants must be handled carefully.


Cat Tails Euphorbia – Succulent plants

Cat Tails Euphorbia (Euphorbia alluaudii) is a spineless succulent shrub that grows up to 12 feet tall. It has narrow, pale green, cylindrical and jointed stems that rise erectly and then arch outwards to form a mass as wide as tall. The stems are tipped in summer with many, up to 0.5-inch long, green leaves and are dotted with brown marks where the leaves were previously attached. In spring and summer at branch tips also appear the very small, yellow-green flower structures (cyathia) that hold the even smaller flowers and the developing fruit is red and somewhat heart-shaped.

Scientific classification:

Family: Euphorbiaceae
Subfamily: Euphorbioideae
Tribe: Euphorbieae
Subtribe: Euphorbiinae
Genus: Euphorbia

Scientific Name: Euphorbia alluaudii
Synonyms: Euphorbia alluaudii subsp. alluaudii, Euphorbia leucodendron, Tirucalia alluaudii.
Common Names: Cat Tails Euphorbia, Sausage Tree, Stick Euphorbia, Yellow-leaf Bush Euphorbia, Milk Bush, Pencil Tree, Stick Cactus, Stick Plant.

How to grow and maintain Cat Tails Euphorbia:

Light:
It prefers full to partial sunlight. Provides good sunlight at least 3-5 hours of the day, and turn it regularly so that your plant doesn’t begin to grow lopsided.

Soil:
It grows well in well-draining, gritty soils or cactus potting mix. They are not particular about soil pH, but they cannot tolerate wet soil.

Water:
You can allow the soil to dry out between each watering. Before watering the plant check underneath the pot through the drainage holes to see if the roots are dry. If so then add some water. Do not water too often to prevent overwatering, that can potentially kill it off.

Temperature:
It prefers an optimal temperatures of 60 degrees Fahrenheit – 85 degrees Fahrenheit / 16 degrees Celsius to 29 degrees Celsius.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize every two weeks with a diluted balanced liquid fertilizer during its growing season in the spring and summer. Avoid fertilizing your plant during the fall and winter months.

Propagation:
Euphorbia can be easily propagated by cuttings. Take cutting in spring, which needs to be dried out for a couple of weeks before potting. Also can be propagated from seed, but they can be difficult to germinate.

Pests and Diseases:
Euphorbia may be susceptible to mealybugs, scale insects, occasionally spider mites.


Euphorbia Species, Cat Tails Euphorbia

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Gardeners' Notes:

On Apr 19, 2017, J_Phx from Tempe, AZ wrote:

I have been trying to locate any Cat Tail Euphorbia in Arizona with no luck. We are looking for 15 gallon size, but I'd take anything at this point. Does anyone know where I can buy them?

On Jun 26, 2010, ogrejelly from Gilbert, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

One thing that is not mentioned here is that this plant has a translucence to it when the sun shines on it it goes right through it so that you can almost see into the plant. Pretty unique look and the photo I posted is how it looks in the dead of winter without any leaves or flowers. Very nice 'young' green color and it took two frosts without being covered so it holds up here pretty well in the Phoenix area.

On May 30, 2008, vossner from East Texas,
United States (Zone 8a) wrote:

similar to a pencil cactus, but branches are slightly thicker. very architectural

On Aug 27, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Got this at a home depot, and just planted it in the ground- no special care.. has gotten down to about 25F and no damage whatsoever. Has grown quite fast and is now a shrub about 4' across and 3.5' tall. keeps growing out further and further, but isn't spreading fast from the ground level. stems are just arching out more. incredibly ornamental plant. just light green smooth stems in a bunch.. very neat and tidy, too. In summers, arms tipped with lots of small, arching green leaves about 1cm long at the most. Does best in full sun. In shade or part sun plant gets very leggy and floppy, its arms falling on the surrounding vegetation.

Eventually, at least in Madagascar where this species is from, this plant gets to be a tree with a large woody stem and all the '. read more arms' above that point. I haven't seen it get that large or even form a stem. yet. Trees get up to 25+' tall.

Barely a zone 9b plant. temps down to 28F not much of a problem, but down to 25F does severe damage, and sometimes can kill plant. TEmps down to 22F at my new home completely wiped out my collection of these plants. oh well.

On Aug 28, 2003, Happenstance from Northern California, CA wrote:

Like all Euphorbia HANDLE WITH CARE, the latex/sap is dangerous and can cause skin rash, itching and general discomfort.


Euphorbia alluaudii (Cat Tails Euphorbia) - garden

Origin and Habitat: South-west Madagascar, extending towards the central high-plateau: Androy Andrahomana Ambovombe (Tsimananada). Extent of occurrence 179,422 km² with an area of occupancy of 148,404 km². It has been recorded at least from 44 localities and comprises of 15 subpopulations
Altitude: 0-1000 metres above sea level.
Habitat and Ecology: Euphorbia alluaudii is found in subhumid, dry or subarid south-western bush areas of Madagascar, as well as the inselbergs and rock faces of the southern central high-plateau. Plants growing in the south-west don’t seem to be restricted by the nature of the soil whereas individuals from the high-plateau require well drained rock outcrops to grow, greatly limiting potential localities. This species is common throughout its range. The area is very rich in succulent plants, some of which are endemic to the region. They include Pachypodium geayi, Alluaudia ascendens, Uncarina abbreviata and Delomlx spp. Habitat degradation, fire, habitat clearing for charcoal, mining for the high-plateau specimens. When old enough this species is possibly used for charcoal.

Description: Euphorbia alluaudii (Cat Tails Euphorbia) is a dioecious (exceptionnaly monoecious) succulent shrub or small tree made up of clusters of cylindrical, jointed, spineless branches. Most of its branches rise erectly from the base and then arch outwards to form a mass as wide as tall. It can ultimately reach to 4(-6) metres though in containers it more commonly grows to a modest 1.2-1.8 metres tall. At the tips of the stems, small yellow flowers will appear in the spring and summer and the developing fruit is red and somewhat heartshaped. Subspecies onoclada may be a good species (Euphorbia oncoclada), as originally described by Drake. Euphorbia leucodendron is a synonym of the typical subspecies.
Stems: Narrow, erect to procumbent, succulent, pale green, cylindrical and jointed. The joints are dotted with brown marks where the leaves were previously attached and also have some relatively large stoma or pores that give them a somewhat speckled appearance. Bark grey, smooth, much delayed. Massive quantities of sap are poured out when a stem is cut. The sap quickly seals and protects the cut surface making subsequent fungal growth less likely.
Leaves: Tiny, green, reduced to scales at near the growing tips on new branches, but they quickly fall off. The stipules form a black glandular ring around the leaf insertion.
Inflorescence: Lateral at the apex of the twigs, cyathophylls identical to incyathescence bracts.
Flowers (cyathia): Always unisexual, dichasial branching of incyathescences (male cyathia are usually more numerous). Nectar glands 5.
Fruits (Capsules): Dehiscent, always erect, trilocular, green thin and smooth, with ridges tinted with purple, 3 seeds per capsule.
Seeds: Testa smooth, ecarunculate.
Similar species: This unusual plant is one of the succulent euphorbias sometimes called "coraliform" or "coraliformes" types, with common names such as Stick Plant, Stick Cactus. It is somewhat similar to Euphorbia tirucalli, but with a bit thicker, more erect, less bushy branches and much slower to form a tree shape.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Euphorbia alluaudii group

  • Euphorbia alluaudii" href='/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Euphorbiaceae/27008/Euphorbia_alluaudii'> Euphorbia alluaudii Drake : Shrub or small tree with, virgate, cylindrical branches, procumbent from the base. Distribution: South-west Madagascar, extending towards the central high-plateau.
  • Euphorbia alluaudii f. criatata" href='/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Euphorbiaceae/27014/Euphorbia_alluaudii_f._criatata'> Euphorbia alluaudii f. criatata hort. : Crested form.
  • Euphorbia alluaudii subs. oncoclada (Drake) F.Friedmann & Cremers : has thicker sausage-like joints about 2,5 cm wide with prominent leaf scars. Distribution: Tulear/Saint-Augustin region.

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) Hermann Jacobsen “Abromeitiella to Euphorbia” Blandford Press, 1960
2) James Cullen, Sabina G. Knees, H. Suzanne Cubey “The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants: A Manual for the Identification of Plants Cultivated in Europe, Both Out-of-Doors and Under Glass” Cambridge University Press, 11/ago/2011
3) Hermann Jacobsen “A handbook of succulent plants: descriptions, synonyms, and cultural details for succulents other than Cactaceae” Volume 1 Blandford Press, 1960
4) Hermann Jacobsen “Lexicon of Succulent Plants” Littlehampton Book Services Ltd. 1975
5) Urs Eggli “Illustrated Handbook of Succulent Plants: Dicotyledons” Springer, 2002
6) The Euphorbia Journal 3: 26 1985
7) Buddensiek, V. “Sukkulente Euphorbien.” 1–176 1998
8) Cremers, G. “Les euphorbes coralliformes de Madagascar.” Bull. Jard. Bot. Belg. 54: 23–64.1984
9) Drake del Castillo, E. “Note sur les plantes recueillies par M. Guillaume Grandidier, dans le Sud de Madagascar, en 1898 et 1901.” in: Bull. Mus. Hist. Nat. (Paris) 9: 35–46, 96–99. 1903
10) Friedmann, F. & G. Cremers. “Observations sur les euphorbes coralliformes de Madagascar.” in: Adansonia, n.s. 16(2): 245–257.1976
11) Palacky, J. “Cat. Pl. Madagasc.” Prague. 4 fasc.1906-1907.
12) Schatz, G. E., S. Andriambololonera, Andrianarivelo, M. W. Callmander, Faranirina, P. P. Lowry, P. B. Phillipson, Rabarimanarivo, J. I. Raharilala, Rajaonary, Rakotonirina, R. H. Ramananjanahary, B. Ramandimbisoa, A. Randrianasolo, N Ravololomanana, Z. S. Rogers, C. M. Taylor & G. A. Wahlert. “Catalogue of the Vascular Plants of Madagascar.” Monogr. Syst. Bot. Missouri Bot. Gard. 0(0): 0–0. 2011
13) Haevermans, T. 2004. Euphorbia alluaudii. In: IUCN 2013. “IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.” Version 2013.2. . Downloaded on 30 April 2014.
14) Euphorbia alluaudii. Available from Tolkin (http://app.tolkin.org/projects/72/taxa). Downloaded on 30 April 2014.
15) Barres, L., Vilatersana, R., Molero, J., Susanna, A., and Galbany-Casals, M. "Molecular phylogeny of Euphorbia subgen. Esula sect. Aphyllis (Euphorbiaceae) inferred from nrDNA and cpDNA markers." in: Taxon 60, 705–720. 2011
16) Bruyns, P.V., Klak, C., and Hanacek, P. “Age and diversity in Old World succulent species of Euphorbia (Euphorbiaceae).” in: Taxon 60(6), 1717–1733. 2011
17) Dorsey, B.L., Haevermans, T., Aubriot, X., Morawetz, J.J., Riina, R., Steinmann, V.W., and Berry, P.E. “Phylogenetics, morphological evolution, and classification of Euphorbia subgenus Euphorbia.” in Taxon 62, 291–315. 2013
18) Steinmann, V., and Porter, M. “Phylogenetic relationships in Euphorbieae (Euphorbiaceae) based on ITS and ndhF sequence data.” in: Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 89, 453-490. 2002

Cultivation and Propagation: It is an easy species to grow that is suited for any well drained soil in full sun. But young plant are happy growing indoors, where they can easily reach the ceiling. Give the plant an airy growing medium which mainly consists of non organic material such us clay, pumice, lava grit, and only a little peat or leaf-mould. Water regularly during the active growing season from March to September. No water should ever be allowed to stand around the roots. Keep almost completely dry in winter. It is a moderately fast grower, and will quickly become large landscape masterpieces in just 3-5 years. It is a relatively fast growing and long lived plant and once established, it will be content in its position and with its soil for years.
Fertilization: Need a perfect fertilizer diet in summer. Use preferably a cacti and succulents fertilizer with high potassium content including all micro nutrients and trace elements or slow release fertilizer.
Exposure: This plant has an excellent heat tolerance, and need full sun to light shade exposures, but can tolerate shade. However shade grown plants will tend to produce fewer, and etiolated growth. The colour of this plant is much more marked if grown in full sun. But if it is possible to keep the growth of this species compact, with denser, shorter stems such plants can be outright attractive.
Watering: Water regularly during the active growing season. No water should ever be allowed to stand around the roots. Keep almost completely dry in winter. Care must be given in watering, keeping them warm and wet while growing, and cooler and dry when dormant.
Hardiness: Frost tender, it can withstand temperatures only above 2º C. However it can be difficult to get it to look its best without a good amount of heat and sun and so it is only really suited to the tropics (USDA Zones 10-12). It can be grown outdoors in the summer months to benefit from direct exposure to light, and especially exposure to high summer temperatures. Protection in a warm greenhouse in the middle of the winter will greatly increase the survival rate.
Rot: Rot it is only a minor problem with Euphorbias if the plants are watered and “aired” correctly. If they are not, fungicides won't help all that much. It is very unlikely to lose this plant from root rot from excessive water.
Manteinance: Re-pot every two years. It like quite small pots, repot in early spring. It can be pruned for shape and branching and trim off the dead 'arms'.
Known hazards: All parts of Euphorbia ooze a milky sap when damaged or cut. Contact with this sap may cause dermatitis in some people, and in the eyes the sap can cause temporary blindness which may last for several days.
Uses: It is an excellent choice to have in a rock garden. They are strong architectural plants that make a definite statement.
Traditional uses: Resin from the stem is used for low-grade rubber, but is said to contain more resin than caoutchouc.
Propagation: The plant can be reproduced by seeds or cuttings. Seeds can only be harvested when the capsule is light brown in colour. Due to the explosive nature of the seeds, one should place cottonwool over the seed capsules to stop them being blasted into the surrounding area. The soft cottonwool will effectively trap any seeds. The seed will loose viability in storage, and may not be viable the following year, so the seed should be planted as soon after harvesting as possible. Use a well-drained sowing medium of sandy loam with very well-rotted compost, and preferably sieved river sand to cover the seed. The ideal size of the sand grains should be 1 mm. Germination usually occurs within about a week or two. Cuttings are relatively easy. If you remove an offset, remember to let it dry for some days, letting the wound heal (cuttings planted too soon easily rot before they can grow roots). Lay it on the soil and insert the stem end partially into the substrate. Try to keep the cutting somewhat upright so that the roots are able to grow downward. It is better to wash the cut to remove the latex. The newly planted stems take a few weeks to establish, and then start growing. The best time to strike cuttings is spring.


Watch the video: Euphorbia alluaudiileucodendronCat tails euphorbia:Care n propagation#unique euphorbia variety