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Pectinaria namaquensis

Pectinaria namaquensis


Succulentopedia

Pectinaria namaquensis

Pectinaria namaquensis is a rare, dwarf, stem succulent, leafless, hairless and forming mats from branching of the stems. The stem are up to 3 inches…


Portulacaria Species, False Portulacaria, Namaqua Porkbush, Namaqualand Ceraria

Family: Didiereaceae
Genus: Portulacaria (por-tew-luh-KAR-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: namaquensis (nam-uh-KWEN-sis) (Info)
Synonym:Ceraria gariepina
Synonym:Ceraria namaquensis

Category:

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Suitable for growing in containers

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Seed Collecting:

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Gardeners' Notes:

On Jan 23, 2015, poeciliopsis from Phoenix, AZ wrote:

Central Phoenix -- My two-year old Ceraria namaquensis is doing well. It is planted in the ground and gets several hours of full summer sun in afternoon and lightly filtered shade in winter, but is slightly etiolated. It receives moderate water. It is said to be frost-hardy, but mine is protected under a 6 foot tall fabric cold frame so I can't judge that. My plant retains it leaves most of the year, probably due to the amount of water it gets.

Sad to report my plant didn't make it through summer 2016. I lost quite a few plants this summer, I think because of the very long period of higher than 100F temperatures.

On Sep 21, 2005, admrclark from Long Beach, CA wrote:

Easy to grow ! Grows like a weed for me and I'm very new at gardening. Clippings from a neighbor and now I have a small bushel.

On Sep 5, 2003, Happenstance from Northern California, CA wrote:

Greenhouse grown, semi-deciduous in non-heated greenhouse, native to South Africa.


List of Succulent Plants from A to Z

Succulents are extremely popular plants to grow right now, but how do you decide which one? We’ve built this list of every succulent houseplant we could think of so that you can consider which one might work best for your house or apartment. Did we miss any? Let us know in the comments and we’ll update.

The Agave Horrida plant is mainly used for decorative purposes. Suitable for the outdoors, it is also called the Century Plant.

Known for its multiple benefits, the plant is one of the most popular succulents. It can be used to ease scrapes, burns or specific skin conditions.

The Quaqua Mammillaris has distinct green stems. The plant is easy to grow indoors or outdoors. However, it will not grow flowers with changing temperatures.

With unusual tubular leaves, the plant is suitable for indoor growing. Regular irrigation is recommended.

Ballerina Flower

The Weberocereus Tonduzii needs plenty of water. It is known for its root issues, in which case, the overly soft roots need to be cut.

Known as the Pygmaeocereus Bieblii, the cactus has short spines. It grows solitary and it grows distinct bright white flowers.

Burro’s Tail

With a shape that resembles a tail, the plant is suitable for indoor decoration. Good drainage is crucial for its container when it comes to proper care.

Christmas Cactus

Theoretically a cactus, the plant is not enjoying too much dryness. To initiate flower bud formation, the plant can be moved outdoors in a shaded spot right after summertime, when temperatures start to drop.

Coastal Stonecrop

The Sedum Litoreum plant is easy to grow. It can be laid directly on the ground, at its permanent growing location.

Crown of Thorns

The plant is known for its low watering needs. Ideally, it is placed in an interior environment where it gets at least 3-4 hours of sulnight each day.

Devil’s Trumpet

With its Tavaresia Angolensis scientific name, the plant has asymmetric flowers. The plant does not grow well in high humidity.

The distinct tropical plant has hundreds of species. It is named after Discordes, a Greek botanist.

Donkey Tail

The hanging plant is used for indoor decorative purposes. It needs weekly watering and a strong light source to reach its two-foot maximum length.

Originating in South Africa, this colorful plant is occurring in the popular area of the Great Karoo. It is part of the Apocynaceae family.

Echeveria Pollux

Suitable for outdoor decoration, the plant has hundreds of hybrids. It can be placed in full sun to reach its maximum height of two inches.

The elegant cacti is native to the US. Its name is derrived from the Latin word “fierce” and the Greek word for “thistle”.

Flaming Katy

Native to Madagascar Island, the plant is very sensitive to cold. It can be a houseplant with temperatures up to 85 degrees, but not lower than 60 degrees.

Ghost Plant

The name of the plant Graptopetalum comes from the Greek words of “marked petals”. Its larger species can reach heights of up to 12 inches.

Gray Stonecrop

Known as the Rhodiola Pachyclados , the plant is not pretentious. Grown outdoors, it can be planted in areas without too much sun.

The succulent plant is also known as the Zebra Cactus. Mostly used for outdoor decoration, the plant comes with thick green leaves.

Hens-and-Chicks

With thousands of species, the plant is known to propagate quickly. Red flowers can bloom with weekly care.

Hooker’s Orchid Cactus

The Epiphyllum Hookeri epiphytic plant is native to Central America. The beautiful plant is also known as Orchid Cacti.

Ipomoea Bolusiana

With a twinning characteristic, the largest plant of the Convolvulaceae family is native to tropical regions. It grows anywhere between 8 and 20 cm in diameter.

Resembling a miniature tree, the plant comes with thick dark green leaves. Once the plant matures, it can grow pink or white flowers.

Jatropha Podagrica

The plant is native in Central America. It is mostly found in Mexico and Nicaragua. It is part of the Euphorbiaceae family.

Resistant to low temperatures, the plant is also called the Beard of Jupiter. It grows in mountainous areas of Europe.

Kedrostis Africana

An African native, the plant has a few other names, such as Bryonia Africana. The plant is a climber, so it needs some type of support.

Keeled Gasteria

With a South African origin, the Gasteria Carinata succulent plant can come in various colors. The plant is known for its slow-growing characteristics, such as its Sakura Fuji hybrid.

Also known as the Karro Rose, the Lapidaria Margaretae plant is part of the Aizoaceae family. It can grow up to three flowers in time.

The low growing plant has a unique look. Black spoting is seen on its leaves. The plant is similar to the Agave family.

Mexican Fencepost Cactus

The Pachycereus Marginatus plant is also known as the Mexican Fence Post Cactus. It has a columnar trunk and it reaches heights of up to 12 feet.

Mouse Tail Cactus

The Rhipsalis Baccifera has long distinct stems. Growing the plant is easy. Its soil should remain moist at all times.

The plant comes with dark green leaves. Its yellow flowers can reach up to 1 inch in diameter.

With flashy leaves, the cactus comes with no spines. It can grow up to 4 feet in height and up to 20 inches in width.

This Obregonia Denegrii plant differentiates itself with its wool-hidden fruits. Growing the plant is not easy and it needs good drainage as well as not too much organic material.

Orange Crown Cactus

The Rebutia Fiebrigii can be grown easilly. The plant should be allowed to dry properly before watering.

With its distinct star-shaped flowers, the Orbea Schweinfurthii plant can be used for decoration. Its flowers have a yellow color with deep red spots.

Oscularia Pedunculata

The green plant can grow up to 1 foot. Its flowers are purple-pink and they can open fully during late spring afternoons.

Pectinaria Namaquensis

With a leafless and hairless profile, the plant is quite rare. Its small flowers have a green to yellow color.

Rhytidocaulon Macrolobum

The plant branches to a miniature tree. They are to be grown outdoors as they immediately die inside the house.

With only one spine per areole, the Mammillaria Spinosissima plant can grow up to 4 inches in diameter. Its flowers are purple-red.

Silver Dollar Vine

The Xerosicyos Danguyi is a climbing plant. It has distinct round leaves. It grows best in full sun.

Syrian Bean Caper

Called the Zygophyllum Fabago, the plant has unique waxy leaves. It grows specifically well in arid areas with not too much water.

Tenshi no Namida

The Tulista Pumila is one of the most popular succulent plants. It has sharp pointy leaves growing in a rosette shape.

Tugela Cliff-Kalancho

The Kalanchoe Longiflora succulent plant is found in Madagascar and South Africa. Its species can come with both wide and narrow leaves.

Uebelmannia Buiningii

The spheric cactus needs plenty of light. Growers need to shelter the cactus from low temperatures.

Villadia Batesii

Often called the Cotyledon batesii, the plant is known for its yellow-green color. It can grow both indoors and outdoors.

Viola Volcanica

The plant grows best in cold cliamtes. Fertilizer is recommended for its to grow properly. Watering is done at least once per week.

Yavia Cryptocarpa

With very small spines, the cactus can grow outdoors, but not in direct sunlight. It needs watering during its growing period.

The Zamioculcas Zamiifolia plant grows everywhere as it needs no care. It is known for its resilience and it doesn’t need too much watering either.

Related

Comments

Charline says

I am surprised you left out Calandrinia, the most attractive of all the succulents. Does it go by another name?


Contents

The natural habitat of this species extends along the Orange River valley, along the border between Namibia and South Africa. It has also been recorded near the coast slightly further north in Namibia. [6]

This is an extremely arid, winter-rainfall area. In cultivation, it requires extremely well-drained soil, and is usually grown grafted onto a root-stock of the more resilient Portulacaria afra.

It reaches heights of 1.3 to 1.8 meters, and typically has small, ovoid, club-shaped leaves.

These succulent leaves are deciduous, and densely coat its stems. The stems are stout and grow upwards, forking. They are very slow-growing. Its flowers are usually unisexual.

  1. ^"Ceraria namaquensis (Sond.) H.Pearson & Stephens — The Plant List". www.theplantlist.org . Retrieved 2017-08-02 .
  2. ^
  3. "Ceraria namaquensis - Overview - Encyclopedia of Life". Encyclopedia of Life . Retrieved 2017-08-02 .
  4. ^JSTOR entry: Ceraria namaquensis
  5. ^ ab P.Bruyns, M.Oliveira-Neto, G.F. Melo de Pinna, C.Klak: Phylogenetic relationships in the Didiereaceae with special reference to subfamily Portulacarioideae. Taxon 63 (5). October 2014. 1053-1064.
  6. ^
  7. "Ceraria namaquensis". www.cactus-art.biz . Retrieved 2017-08-02 .
  8. ^Annals of the South African Museum 9: 33. 1912. (Ann. S. African Mus.)

This Caryophyllales article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.


Contents

  • 1 Acokanthera
  • 2 Adenium
  • 3 Ancylobothrys
  • 4 Anisotoma
  • 5 Araujia
  • 6 Arduina
  • 7 Asclepias
  • 8 Aspidoglossum
  • 9 Aspidonepsis
  • 10 Astephanus
  • 11 Australluma
  • 12 Brachystelma
  • 13 Callichilia
  • 14 Calotropis
  • 15 Caralluma
  • 16 Carandas
  • 17 Carissa
  • 18 Cascabela
  • 19 Catharanthus
  • 20 Ceropegia
  • 21 Chlorocyathus
  • 22 Cordylogyne
  • 23 Cryptolepis
  • 24 Cryptostegia
  • 25 Curroria
  • 26 Cynanchum
  • 27 Daemia
  • 28 Dichaelia
  • 29 Diplorhynchus
  • 30 Dregea
  • 31 Duvalia
  • 32 Echites
  • 33 Ectadiopsis
  • 34 Ectadium
  • 35 Emplectanthus
  • 36 Ephippiocarpa
  • 37 Eustegia
  • 38 Fanninia
  • 39 Fockea
  • 40 Gomphocarpus
  • 41 Gonioma
  • 42 Gymnema
  • 43 Holarrhena
  • 44 Hoodia
  • 45 Huernia
  • 46 Huerniopsis
  • 47 Ischnolepis
  • 48 Jasminonerium
  • 49 Kanahia
  • 50 Lagarinthus
  • 51 Landolphia
  • 52 Larryleachia
  • 53 Lavrania
  • 54 Luckhoffia
  • 55 Macropetalum
  • 56 Marsdenia
  • 57 Microloma
  • 58 Miraglossum
  • 59 Mondia
  • 60 Nerium
  • 61 Notechidnopsis
  • 62 Oncinema
  • 63 Oncinotis
  • 64 Ophionella
  • 65 Orbea
  • 66 Orbeanthus
  • 67 Orbeopsis
  • 68 Orthanthera
  • 69 Pachycarpus
  • 70 Pachycymbium
  • 71 Pachypodium
  • 72 Parapodium
  • 73 Pectinaria
  • 74 Pentarrhinum
  • 75 Pentopetia
  • 76 Pergularia
  • 77 Periglossum
  • 78 Petopentia
  • 79 Piaranthus
  • 80 Quaqua
  • 81 Raphionacme
  • 82 Rauvolfia
  • 83 Rhyssolobium
  • 84 Richtersveldia
  • 85 Riocreuxia
  • 86 Sarcostemma
  • 87 Schizoglossum
  • 88 Schizostephanus
  • 89 Secamone
  • 90 Sisyranthus
  • 91 Sphaerocodon
  • 92 Stapelia
  • 93 Stapeliopsis
  • 94 Stenostelma
  • 95 Stomatostemma
  • 96 Strophanthus
  • 97 Tabernaemontana
  • 98 Tacazzea
  • 99 Tavaresia
  • 100 Telosma
  • 101 Tenaris
  • 102 Thevetia
  • 103 Trachycalymma
  • 104 Trichocaulon
  • 105 Tridentea
  • 106 Tromotriche
  • 107 Tylophora
  • 108 Vinca
  • 109 Voacanga
  • 110 Woodia
  • 111 Wrightia
  • 112 Xysmalobium
  • 113 Hybrids
  • 114 References

  • Acokanthera oblongifolia (Hochst.) Codd, indigenous
  • Acokanthera oppositifolia (Lam.) Codd, indigenous
  • Acokanthera rotundata (Codd) Kupicha, indigenous

  • Adenium multiflorum Klotzsch, indigenous
  • Adenium oleifolium Stapf, indigenous
  • Adenium swazicum Stapf, indigenous

  • Ancylobothrys capensis (Oliv.) Pichon, indigenous
  • Ancylobothrys petersiana (Klotzsch) Pierre, indigenous

  • Araujia sericifera Brot. not indigenous, naturalised, invasive

  • Arduina acuminata E.Mey. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Arduina bispinosa L. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Arduina edulis (Vahl) Spreng. accepted as Carissa spinarum L. indigenous
  • Arduina erythrocarpa Eckl. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Arduina ferox E.Mey. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Arduina grandiflora E.Mey. accepted as Carissa macrocarpa (Eckl.) A.DC. indigenous
  • Arduina haematocarpa Eckl. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Arduina macrocarpa Eckl. accepted as Carissa macrocarpa (Eckl.) A.DC. indigenous
  • Arduina megaphylla Gand. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Arduina tetramera Sacleux, accepted as Carissa tetramera (Sacleux) Stapf, indigenous

  • Asclepias adscendens (Schltr.) Schltr. indigenous
  • Asclepias affinis (Schltr.) Schltr. accepted as Asclepias albens (E.Mey.) Schltr. present
  • Asclepias albens (E.Mey.) Schltr. indigenous
  • Asclepias aurea (Schltr.) Schltr. indigenous
  • Asclepias bicuspis N.E.Br. endemic
  • Asclepias brevicuspis (E.Mey.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias brevipes (Schltr.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias buchenaviana Schinz, accepted as Gomphocarpus filiformis (E.Mey.) D.Dietr. present
  • Asclepias burchellii Schltr. accepted as Gomphocarpus tomentosus Burch. subsp. tomentosus, present
  • Asclepias cancellata Burm.f. accepted as Gomphocarpus cancellatus (Burm.f.) Bruyns, present
  • Asclepias cognata N.E.Br. accepted as Aspidonepsis cognata (N.E.Br.) Nicholas & Goyder, indigenous
  • Asclepias compressidens (N.E.Br.) Nicholas, endemic
  • Asclepias concinna (Schltr.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias cooperi N.E.Br. endemic
  • Asclepias crassinervis N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Asclepias crinita (G.Bertol.) N.E.Br. accepted as Gomphocarpus fruticosus (L.) Aiton f. subsp. fruticosus
  • Asclepias crispa P.J.Bergius, indigenous
    • Asclepias crispa P.J.Bergius var. crispa, endemic
    • Asclepias crispa P.J.Bergius var. plana N.E.Br. endemic
    • Asclepias crispa P.J.Bergius var. pseudocrispa N.E.Br. endemic
  • Asclepias cucullata (Schltr.) Schltr. indigenous
    • Asclepias cucullata (Schltr.) Schltr. subsp. cucullata, indigenous
  • Asclepias cultriformis (Harv. ex Schltr.) Schltr. indigenous
  • Asclepias curassavica L. not indigenous, naturalised
  • Asclepias decipiens N.E.Br. accepted as Gomphocarpus fruticosus (L.) Aiton f. subsp. decipiens (N.E.Br.) Goyder & Nicholas, present
  • Asclepias densiflora N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Asclepias depressa (Schltr.) Schltr. accepted as Asclepias multicaulis (E.Mey.) Schltr. present
  • Asclepias diploglossa (Turcz.) Druce, accepted as Aspidonepsis diploglossa (Turcz.) Nicholas & Goyder, indigenous
  • Asclepias disparilis N.E.Br. endemic
  • Asclepias dissona N.E.Br. endemic
    • Asclepias dregeana Schltr. var. calceolus (S.Moore) N.E.Br. accepted as Asclepias fulva N.E.Br. indigenous
    • Asclepias dregeana Schltr. var. sordida N.E.Br. accepted as Asclepias fulva N.E.Br. present
  • Asclepias eminens (Harv.) Schltr. indigenous
  • Asclepias expansa (E.Mey.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias fallax (Schltr.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias filiformis (E.Mey.) Benth. & Hook. ex Kuntze, accepted as Gomphocarpus filiformis (E.Mey.) D.Dietr. indigenous
  • Asclepias flava N.E.Br. accepted as Aspidonepsis flava (N.E.Br.) Nicholas & Goyder, indigenous
  • Asclepias flexuosa (E.Mey.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias fruticosa L. accepted as Gomphocarpus fruticosus (L.) Aiton f. subsp. fruticosus, present
  • Asclepias fulva N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Asclepias gibba (E.Mey.) Schltr. indigenous
    • Asclepias gibba (E.Mey.) Schltr. var. gibba, indigenous
    • Asclepias gibba (E.Mey.) Schltr. var. media N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Asclepias glaucophylla (Schltr.) Schltr. accepted as Gomphocarpus glaucophyllus Schltr. present
  • Asclepias gordon-grayae Nicholas, endemic
  • Asclepias hastata (E.Mey.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias humilis (E.Mey.) Schltr. indigenous
  • Asclepias macropus (Schltr.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias meliodora (Schltr.) Schltr. indigenous
    • Asclepias meliodora (Schltr.) Schltr. var. brevicoronata N.E.Br. accepted as Asclepias meliodora (Schltr.) Schltr. present
  • Asclepias meyeriana (Schltr.) Schltr. indigenous
  • Asclepias montevaga M.Glen, Nicholas & Bester, indigenous
  • Asclepias monticola N.E.Br. endemic
  • Asclepias multicaulis (E.Mey.) Schltr. indigenous
  • Asclepias multiflora (Decne.) N.E.Br. endemic
  • Asclepias nana I.Verd. endemic
  • Asclepias navicularis (E.Mey.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias oreophila Nicholas, indigenous
  • Asclepias patens N.E.Br. endemic
  • Asclepias peltigera (E.Mey.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias physocarpa (E.Mey.) Schltr. accepted as Gomphocarpus physocarpus E.Mey. present
  • Asclepias praemorsa Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias pulchella (Decne.) N.E.Br. accepted as Asclepias ameliae S.Moore, present
  • Asclepias rara N.E.Br. endemic
  • Asclepias reenensis N.E.Br. accepted as Aspidonepsis reenensis (N.E.Br.) Nicholas & Goyder, indigenous
  • Asclepias rivularis (Schltr.) Schltr. accepted as Gomphocarpus rivularis Schltr. present
  • Asclepias rostrata N.E.Br. accepted as Gomphocarpus fruticosus (L.) Aiton f. subsp. rostratus (N.E.Br.) Goyder & Nicholas
  • Asclepias sabulosa Schltr. accepted as Asclepias crispa P.J.Bergius var. crispa, present
  • Asclepias schizoglossoides Schltr. accepted as Aspidonepsis diploglossa (Turcz.) Nicholas & Goyder, indigenous
  • Asclepias schlechteri (K.Schum.) N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Asclepias schweinfurthii N.E.Br. accepted as Pachycarpus lineolatus (Decne.) Bullock
  • Asclepias stellifera Schltr. indigenous
  • Asclepias ulophylla Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias velutina (Schltr.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias vicaria N.E.Br. endemic
  • Asclepias viridiflora (E.Mey.) Goyder, accepted as Asclepias fulva N.E.Br. present
  • Asclepias woodii (Schltr.) Schltr. endemic
  • Asclepias xysmalobioides Hilliard & B.L.Burtt, accepted as Asclepias montevaga M.Glen, Nicholas & Bester, indigenous

  • Aspidoglossum albocoronatum Bester & Nicholas, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum araneiferum (Schltr.) Kupicha, indigenous
  • Aspidoglossum biflorum E.Mey. indigenous
  • Aspidoglossum carinatum (Schltr.) Kupicha, indigenous
  • Aspidoglossum delagoense (Schltr.) Kupicha, indigenous
  • Aspidoglossum demissum Kupicha, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum difficile Hilliard, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum dissimile (N.E.Br.) Kupicha, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum fasciculare E.Mey. indigenous
  • Aspidoglossum flanaganii (Schltr.) Kupicha, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum glabrescens (Schltr.) Kupicha, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum glanduliferum (Schltr.) Kupicha, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum gracile (E.Mey.) Kupicha, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum grandiflorum (Schltr.) Kupicha, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum heterophyllum E.Mey. endemic
  • Aspidoglossum interruptum (E.Mey.) Bullock, indigenous
  • Aspidoglossum lamellatum (Schltr.) Kupicha, indigenous
  • Aspidoglossum ovalifolium (Schltr.) Kupicha, indigenous
  • Aspidoglossum restioides (Schltr.) Kupicha, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum uncinatum (N.E.Br.) Kupicha, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum validum Kupicha, indigenous
  • Aspidoglossum virgatum (E.Mey.) Kupicha, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum woodii (Schltr.) Kupicha, endemic
  • Aspidoglossum xanthosphaerum Hilliard, endemic

  • Aspidonepsis cognata (N.E.Br.) Nicholas & Goyder, endemic
  • Aspidonepsis diploglossa (Turcz.) Nicholas & Goyder, indigenous
  • Aspidonepsis flava (N.E.Br.) Nicholas & Goyder, endemic
  • Aspidonepsis reenensis (N.E.Br.) Nicholas & Goyder, indigenous
  • Aspidonepsis shebae Nicholas & Goyder, endemic

  • Astephanus marginatus Decne. accepted as Astephanus zeyheri Turcz. present
  • Astephanus triflorus (L.f.) Schult. endemic
  • Astephanus zeyheri Turcz. endemic

  • Brachystelma angustum Peckover, endemic
  • Brachystelma arnotii Baker, indigenous
  • Brachystelma australe R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma barberae Harv. ex Hook.f. indigenous
  • Brachystelma brevipedicellatum Turrill, endemic
    • Brachystelma bruceae]] R.A.Dyer, indigenous
    • Brachystelma bruceae R.A.Dyer subsp. bruceae, endemic
    • Brachystelma bruceae R.A.Dyer subsp. hirsutum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma burchellii (Decne.) Peckover, indigenous
    • Brachystelma burchellii (Decne.) Peckover var. burchellii, indigenous
    • Brachystelma burchellii (Decne.) Peckover var. grandiflorum (N.E.Br.) Meve, indigenous
  • Brachystelma caffrum (Schltr.) N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma campanulatum N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma canum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma cathcartense R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma chloranthum (Schltr.) Peckover, indigenous
  • Brachystelma chlorozonum E.A.Bruce, endemic
  • Brachystelma christianeae Peckover, endemic
  • Brachystelma circinatum E.Mey. indigenous
  • Brachystelma coddii R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Brachystelma comptum N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma cummingii A.P.Dold, indigenous
  • Brachystelma cupulatum R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Brachystelma decipiens N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma delicatum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma dimorphum R.A.Dyer, indigenous
    • Brachystelma dimorphum R.A.Dyer subsp. dimorphum, endemic
    • Brachystelma dimorphum R.A.Dyer subsp. gratum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma discoideum R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Brachystelma duplicatum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma dyeri K.Balkwill & M.Balkwill, endemic
  • Brachystelma elongatum (Schltr.) N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma filifolium (N.E.Br.) Peckover, indigenous
  • Brachystelma foetidum Schltr. indigenous
  • Brachystelma franksiae N.E.Br. indigenous
    • Brachystelma franksiae N.E.Br. subsp. franksiae, endemic
    • Brachystelma franksiae N.E.Br. subsp. grandiflorum A.P.Dold & Bruyns, endemic
  • Brachystelma gemmeum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma gerrardii Harv. indigenous
  • Brachystelma glenense R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma gracile E.A.Bruce, indigenous
  • Brachystelma gracillimum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma gymnopodum (Schltr.) Bruyns, indigenous
  • Brachystelma hirtellum Weim. indigenous
  • Brachystelma huttonii (Harv.) N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma incanum R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Brachystelma inconspicuum S.Venter, endemic
  • Brachystelma kerzneri Peckover, endemic
  • Brachystelma longifolium (Schltr.) N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma luteum Peckover, endemic
  • Brachystelma macropetalum (Schltr.) N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Brachystelma meyerianum Schltr. endemic
  • Brachystelma micranthum E.Mey. endemic
  • Brachystelma minimum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma minor E.A.Bruce, endemic
  • Brachystelma modestum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma molaventi Peckover & A.E.van Wyk, endemic
  • Brachystelma montanum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma nanum (Schltr.) N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma natalense (Schltr.) N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma ngomense R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma occidentale Schltr. endemic
  • Brachystelma oianthum Schltr. endemic
  • Brachystelma pachypodium R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma parvulum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma perditum R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Brachystelma petraeum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma pilosum R.A.Dyer, accepted as Brachystelma hirtellum Weim. present
  • Brachystelma praelongum S.Moore, indigenous
  • Brachystelma pulchellum (Harv.) Schltr. endemic
  • Brachystelma pygmaeum (Schltr.) N.E.Br. indigenous
    • Brachystelma pygmaeum (Schltr.) N.E.Br. subsp. flavidum (Schltr.) R.A.Dyer, endemic
    • Brachystelma pygmaeum (Schltr.) N.E.Br. subsp. pygmaeum, endemic
  • Brachystelma ramosissimum (Schltr.) N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Brachystelma remotum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma rubellum (E.Mey.) Peckover, indigenous
  • Brachystelma sandersonii (Oliv.) N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma schizoglossoides (Schltr.) N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma schoenlandianum Schltr. endemic
  • Brachystelma setosum Peckover, endemic
  • Brachystelma stellatum E.A.Bruce & R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Brachystelma stenophyllum (Schltr.) R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Brachystelma swazicum R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Brachystelma tabularium R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma tenellum R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma tenue R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma theronii Bruyns, indigenous
  • Brachystelma thunbergii N.E.Br. endemic
  • Brachystelma tuberosum (Meerb.) R.Br. ex Sims, indigenous
  • Brachystelma vahrmeijeri R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Brachystelma villosum (Schltr.) N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Brachystelma waterbergensis Peckover, endemic

  • Calotropis busseana K.Schum. accepted as Pachycarpus lineolatus (Decne.) Bullock
  • Calotropis procera (Aiton) W.T.Aiton, not indigenous, naturalised, invasive

  • Caralluma arida (Masson) N.E.Br. accepted as Quaqua arida (N.E.Br.) Plowes, present
  • Caralluma chlorantha Schltr. endemic
  • Caralluma intermedia (N.E.Br.) Schltr. endemic
  • Caralluma maughani R.A.Dyer, accepted as Pectinaria maughanii (R.A.Dyer) Bruyns, present
  • Caralluma nebrownii A.Berger, accepted as Orbea lutea (N.E.Br.) Bruyns subsp. vaga (N.E.Br.) Bruyns
  • Caralluma peschii Nel, accepted as Australluma peschii (Nel) Plowes

  • Carandas arduina (Lam.) S.Moore, accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Carandas edulis (Vahl) Hiern, accepted as Carissa spinarum L. indigenous

  • Carissa acuminata (E.Mey.) A.DC. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Carissa arduina Lam. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
    • Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan subsp. zambesiensis Kupicha, accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
    • Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan var. acuminata (E.Mey.) Codd, accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Carissa cordata (Mill.) Fourc. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan
  • Carissa edulis Vahl, accepted as Carissa spinarum L. indigenous
  • Carissa edulis Vahl subsp. continentalis Pichon, accepted as Carissa spinarum L. indigenous
  • Carissa erythrocarpa (Eckl.) A.DC. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Carissa ferox (E.Mey.) A.DC. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Carissa grandiflora (E.Mey.) A.DC. accepted as Carissa macrocarpa (Eckl.) A.DC. indigenous
  • Carissa haematocarpa (Eckl.) A.DC. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous
  • Carissa macrocarpa (Eckl.) A.DC. indigenous
  • Carissa spinarum L. indigenous
  • Carissa tetramera (Sacleux) Stapf, indigenous
  • Carissa wyliei N.E.Br. accepted as Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. ex Brenan, indigenous

  • Cascabela thevetia (L.) Lippold, not indigenous, cultivated, naturalised, invasive

  • Catharanthus roseus (L.) G.Don, not indigenous, naturalised, invasive

  • Ceropegia africana R.Br. indigenous
    • Ceropegia africana R.Br. subsp. africana, endemic
    • Ceropegia africana R.Br. subsp. barklyi Bruyns, indigenous
  • Ceropegia ampliata E.Mey. indigenous
    • Ceropegia ampliata E.Mey. var. ampliata, indigenous
  • Ceropegia antennifera Schltr. endemic
  • Ceropegia apiculata Schltr. accepted as Ceropegia lugardae N.E.Br.
  • Ceropegia arenaria R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Ceropegia barbata R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Ceropegia barbertonensis N.E.Br. accepted as Ceropegia linearis E.Mey. subsp. woodii (Schltr.) H.Huber
  • Ceropegia barklyi Hook.f. accepted as Ceropegia africana R.Br. subsp. barklyi Bruyns, present
  • Ceropegia bowkeri Harv. indigenous
    • Ceropegia bowkeri Harv. subsp. bowkeri, endemic
    • Ceropegia bowkeri Harv. subsp. sororia (Harv. ex Hook.f.) R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Ceropegia cancellata Rchb. endemic
  • Ceropegia carnosa E.Mey. indigenous
  • Ceropegia cimiciodora Oberm. indigenous
  • Ceropegia connivens R.A.Dyer, accepted as Ceropegia fimbriata E.Mey. subsp. connivens (R.A.Dyer) Bruyns, present
    • Ceropegia connivens R.A.Dyer forma angustata R.A.Dyer, accepted as Ceropegia fimbriata E.Mey. subsp. connivens (R.A.Dyer) Bruyns, present
  • Ceropegia conrathii Schltr. endemic
  • Ceropegia craibii J.Victor, endemic
  • Ceropegia crassifolia Schltr. indigenous
    • Ceropegia crassifolia Schltr. var. crassifolia, indigenous
  • Ceropegia cycniflora R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Ceropegia decidua E.A.Bruce, indigenous
    • Ceropegia decidua E.A.Bruce subsp. decidua, indigenous
    • Ceropegia decidua E.A.Bruce subsp. pretoriensis R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Ceropegia distincta N.E.Br. indigenous
    • Ceropegia distincta N.E.Br. subsp. haygarthii (Schltr.) H.Huber, accepted as Ceropegia haygarthii Schltr. present
    • Ceropegia distincta N.E.Br. subsp. lugardae (N.E.Br.) H.Huber, accepted as Ceropegia lugardae N.E.Br.
    • Ceropegia distincta N.E.Br. subsp. verruculosa R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Ceropegia dubia R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Ceropegia filiformis (Burch.) Schltr. indigenous
  • Ceropegia fimbriata E.Mey. indigenous
    • Ceropegia fimbriata E.Mey. subsp. connivens (R.A.Dyer) Bruyns, endemic
    • Ceropegia fimbriata E.Mey. subsp. fimbriata, indigenous
    • Ceropegia fimbriata E.Mey. subsp. geniculata (R.A.Dyer) Bruyns, endemic
  • Ceropegia fortuita R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Ceropegia geniculata R.A.Dyer, accepted as Ceropegia fimbriata E.Mey. subsp. geniculata (R.A.Dyer) Bruyns, present
  • Ceropegia hastata N.E.Br. accepted as Ceropegia linearis E.Mey. subsp. woodii (Schltr.) H.Huber
  • Ceropegia haygarthii Schltr. endemic
  • Ceropegia insignis R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Ceropegia leptophylla Bruyns, indigenous
  • Ceropegia linearis E.Mey. indigenous
    • Ceropegia linearis E.Mey. subsp. linearis, indigenous
    • Ceropegia linearis E.Mey. subsp. tenuis (N.E.Br.) Bruyns, endemic
    • Ceropegia linearis E.Mey. subsp. woodii (Schltr.) H.Huber, indigenous
  • Ceropegia macmasteri A.P.Dold, indigenous
  • Ceropegia mafekingensis (N.E.Br.) R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Ceropegia meyeri Decne. indigenous
  • Ceropegia multiflora Baker, indigenous
    • Ceropegia multiflora Baker subsp. multiflora, indigenous
    • Ceropegia multiflora Baker subsp. tentaculata (N.E.Br.) H.Huber, indigenous
  • Ceropegia namaquensis Bruyns, endemic
  • Ceropegia nilotica Kotschy, indigenous
    • Ceropegia nilotica Kotschy var. nilotica, indigenous
  • Ceropegia occidentalis R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Ceropegia occulta R.A.Dyer, endemic
  • Ceropegia pachystelma Schltr. indigenous
    • Ceropegia pachystelma Schltr. subsp. pachystelma, indigenous
  • Ceropegia pumila N.E.Br. accepted as Brachystelma gymnopodum (Schltr.) Bruyns
  • Ceropegia pygmaea Schinz, accepted as Brachystelma gymnopodum (Schltr.) Bruyns, present
  • Ceropegia racemosa N.E.Br. subsp. setifera (Schltr.) H.Huber, accepted as Ceropegia carnosa E.Mey. present
  • Ceropegia radicans Schltr. indigenous
    • Ceropegia radicans Schltr. subsp. radicans, endemic
    • Ceropegia radicans Schltr. subsp. smithii (M.R.Hend.) R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Ceropegia rendallii N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Ceropegia rudatisii Schltr. endemic
  • Ceropegia sandersonii Decne. ex Hook. indigenous
  • Ceropegia scabriflora N.E.Br. endemic
  • Ceropegia schoenlandii N.E.Br. accepted as Ceropegia linearis E.Mey. subsp. woodii (Schltr.) H.Huber
  • Ceropegia stapeliiformis Haw. indigenous
    • Ceropegia stapeliiformis Haw. subsp. serpentina (E.A.Bruce) R.A.Dyer, indigenous
    • Ceropegia stapeliiformis Haw. subsp. stapeliiformis, endemic
  • Ceropegia stenantha K.Schum. indigenous
  • Ceropegia stentiae E.A.Bruce, endemic
  • Ceropegia tenuis N.E.Br. accepted as Ceropegia linearis E.Mey. subsp. tenuis (N.E.Br.) Bruyns, present
  • Ceropegia tomentosa Schltr. endemic
  • Ceropegia turricula E.A.Bruce, endemic
  • Ceropegia woodii Schltr. accepted as Ceropegia linearis E.Mey. subsp. woodii (Schltr.) H.Huber, present
  • Ceropegia zeyheri Schltr. endemic

  • Chlorocyathus lobulata (Venter & R.L.Verh.) Venter, endemic
  • Chlorocyathus monteiroae Oliv. indigenous

  • Cryptolepis capensis Schltr. indigenous
  • Cryptolepis cryptolepioides (Schltr.) Bullock, indigenous
  • Cryptolepis decidua (Planch. ex Benth.) N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Cryptolepis delagoensis Schltr. indigenous
  • Cryptolepis oblongifolia (Meisn.) Schltr. indigenous
  • Cryptolepis obtusa N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Cryptolepis transvaalensis Schltr. accepted as Cryptolepis cryptolepioides (Schltr.) Bullock, present

  • Cryptostegia grandiflora R.Br. not indigenous, naturalised, invasive
  • Cryptostegia madagascariensis Bojer, not indigenous, naturalised, invasive

  • Curroria decidua Planch. ex Benth. subsp. decidua, accepted as Cryptolepis decidua (Planch. ex Benth.) N.E.Br. present

  • Cynanchum africanum (L.) Hoffmanns. endemic
    • Cynanchum africanum R.Br. var. crassifolium N.E.Br. accepted as Cynanchum africanum (L.) Hoffmanns. present
  • Cynanchum capense Thunb. accepted as Pentatropis capensis (L.f.) Bullock, present
  • Cynanchum ellipticum (Harv.) R.A.Dyer, indigenous
  • Cynanchum gerrardii (Harv.) Liede, indigenous
  • Cynanchum hastatum Pers. accepted as Leptadenia hastata (Pers.) Decne.
  • Cynanchum intermedium N.E.Br. accepted as Cynanchum africanum (L.) Hoffmanns. present
  • Cynanchum meyeri (Decne.) Schltr. indigenous
  • Cynanchum mossambicense K.Schum. indigenous
  • Cynanchum natalitium Schltr. endemic
  • Cynanchum obtusifolium L.f. indigenous
    • Cynanchum obtusifolium L.f. var. pilosum Schltr. accepted as Cynanchum obtusifolium L.f. present
  • Cynanchum orangeanum (Schltr.) N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Cynanchum pearsonianum Liede & Meve, indigenous
  • Cynanchum schistoglossum Schltr. indigenous
  • Cynanchum validum N.E.Br. accepted as Schizostephanus alatus Hochst. ex K.Schum. indigenous
  • Cynanchum viminale (L.) Bassi, indigenous
    • Cynanchum viminale (L.) Bassi subsp. orangeanum (Liede & Meve) Liede & Meve, endemic
    • Cynanchum viminale (L.) Bassi subsp. suberosum (Meve & Liede) Goyder, indigenous
    • Cynanchum viminale (L.) Bassi subsp. thunbergii (G.Don) Liede & Meve, indigenous
    • Cynanchum viminale (L.) Bassi subsp. viminale, indigenous
  • Cynanchum virens (E.Mey.) D.Dietr. indigenous
  • Cynanchum zeyheri Schltr. endemic

  • Daemia barbata Schltr. accepted as Pergularia daemia (Forssk.) Chiov. subsp. daemia

  • Dichaelia breviflora Schltr. subsp. pygmaea Schltr. accepted as Brachystelma pygmaeum (Schltr.) N.E.Br. subsp. pygmaeum

  • Dregea floribunda E.Mey. accepted as Marsdenia dregea (Harv.) Schltr. present
  • Dregea macrantha Klotzsch, accepted as Marsdenia macrantha (Klotzsch) Schltr. present

  • Duvalia angustiloba N.E.Br. endemic
  • Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. indigenous
    • Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. caespitosa, indigenous
    • Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. pubescens (N.E.Br.) Bruyns, indigenous
    • Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. vestita (Meve) Bruyns, endemic
    • Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. var. compacta (Haw.) Meve, accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. caespitosa, endemic
  • Duvalia compacta Haw. accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. caespitosa, present
  • Duvalia corderoyi (Hook.f.) N.E.Br. endemic
  • Duvalia elegans (Masson) Haw. endemic
    • Duvalia elegans (Masson) Haw. var. namaquana N.E.Br. accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. pubescens (N.E.Br.) Bruyns, present
    • Duvalia elegans (Masson) Haw. var. seminuda N.E.Br. accepted as Duvalia elegans (Masson) Haw. present
  • Duvalia emiliana A.C.White, accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. caespitosa, present
  • Duvalia gracilis Meve, accepted as Duvalia modesta N.E.Br. endemic
  • Duvalia immaculata (C.A.Luckh.) Bayer ex L.C.Leach, endemic
  • Duvalia maculata N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Duvalia modesta N.E.Br. endemic
  • Duvalia parviflora N.E.Br. endemic
  • Duvalia pillansii N.E.Br. endemic
    • Duvalia pillansii N.E.Br. var. albanica N.E.Br. accepted as Duvalia pillansii N.E.Br. present
  • Duvalia polita N.E.Br. indigenous
    • Duvalia polita N.E.Br. var. parviflora (L.Bolus) A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Duvalia polita N.E.Br. present
    • Duvalia polita N.E.Br. var. transvaalensis (Schltr.) A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Duvalia polita N.E.Br. present
  • Duvalia procumbens R.A.Dyer, accepted as Huernia procumbens (R.A.Dyer) L.C.Leach, present
  • Duvalia pubescens N.E.Br. accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. pubescens (N.E.Br.) Bruyns, present
    • Duvalia pubescens N.E.Br. var. major N.E.Br. accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. pubescens (N.E.Br.) Bruyns, present
  • Duvalia radiata (Sims) Haw. accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. caespitosa, present
    • Duvalia radiata (Sims) Haw. var. hirtella (Jacq.) A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. caespitosa, present
    • Duvalia radiata (Sims) Haw. var. minor (N.E.Br.) A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. caespitosa, present
    • Duvalia radiata (Sims) Haw. var. obscura (N.E.Br.) A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. caespitosa, present
  • Duvalia reclinata (Masson) Haw. accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. caespitosa, present
  • Duvalia reclinata (Masson) Haw. var. angulata N.E.Br. accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. caespitosa, present
  • Duvalia reclinata (Masson) Haw. var. bifida N.E.Br. accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. caespitosa, present
  • Duvalia vestita Meve, accepted as Duvalia caespitosa (Masson) Haw. subsp. vestita (Meve) Bruyns, endemic

  • Echites succulentus L.f. accepted as Pachypodium succulentum (L.f.) Sweet, indigenous
  • Echites tuberosus Haw. ex Steud. accepted as Pachypodium succulentum (L.f.) Sweet, indigenous

  • Ectadiopsis acutifolia (Sond.) Benth. accepted as Cryptolepis oblongifolia (Meisn.) Schltr.
  • Ectadiopsis oblongifolia (Meisn.) Benth. accepted as Cryptolepis oblongifolia (Meisn.) Schltr. present

  • Eustegia filiformis (L.f.) Schult. endemic
  • Eustegia fraterna N.E.Br. indigenous
    • Eustegia fraterna N.E.Br. var. fraterna, endemic
    • Eustegia fraterna N.E.Br. var. pubescens N.E.Br. endemic
  • Eustegia macropetala Schltr. endemic
  • Eustegia minuta (L.f.) R.Br. endemic
  • Eustegia plicata Schinz, endemic

  • Fockea angustifolia K.Schum. indigenous
  • Fockea capensis Endl. endemic
  • Fockea comaru (E.Mey.) N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Fockea crispa (Jacq.) K.Schum. accepted as Fockea capensis Endl. present
  • Fockea cylindrica R.A.Dyer, accepted as Fockea edulis (Thunb.) K.Schum. present
  • Fockea edulis (Thunb.) K.Schum. indigenous
  • Fockea gracilis R.A.Dyer, accepted as Fockea comaru (E.Mey.) N.E.Br. present
  • Fockea sinuata (E.Mey.) Druce, indigenous
  • Fockea tugelensis N.E.Br. accepted as Fockea angustifolia K.Schum. present

  • Gomphocarpus cancellatus (Burm.f.) Bruyns, indigenous
  • Gomphocarpus diploglossus Turcz. accepted as Aspidonepsis diploglossa (Turcz.) Nicholas & Goyder, indigenous
  • Gomphocarpus filiformis (E.Mey.) D.Dietr. indigenous
  • Gomphocarpus fruticosus (L.) Aiton f. indigenous
    • Gomphocarpus fruticosus (L.) Aiton f. subsp. decipiens (N.E.Br.) Goyder & Nicholas, indigenous
    • Gomphocarpus fruticosus (L.) Aiton f. subsp. fruticosus, indigenous
  • Gomphocarpus glaucophyllus Schltr. indigenous
  • Gomphocarpus physocarpus E.Mey. indigenous
  • Gomphocarpus rivularis Schltr. indigenous
  • Gomphocarpus tomentosus (Torr.) A.Gray, accepted as Asclepias californica Greene, present
  • Gomphocarpus tomentosus Burch. indigenous
    • Gomphocarpus tomentosus Burch. subsp. tomentosus, indigenous

  • Gymnema sylvestre (Retz.) Schult. accepted as Marsdenia sylvestris (Retz.) P.I.Forst. present

  • Holarrhena pubescens (Buch.-Ham.) Wall. ex G.Don, indigenous

  • Hoodia albispina N.E.Br. accepted as Hoodia gordonii (Masson) Sweet ex Decne. present
  • Hoodia alstonii (N.E.Br.) Plowes, indigenous
  • Hoodia bainii Dyer, accepted as Hoodia gordonii (Masson) Sweet ex Decne. present
  • Hoodia barklyi Dyer, accepted as Hoodia gordonii (Masson) Sweet ex Decne. present
  • Hoodia burkei N.E.Br. accepted as Hoodia gordonii (Masson) Sweet ex Decne. present
  • Hoodia currorii (Hook.) Decne. indigenous
    • Hoodia currorii (Hook.) Decne. subsp. lugardii (N.E.Br.) Bruyns, indigenous
    • Hoodia currorii (Hook.) Decne. var. currorii, accepted as Hoodia currorii (Hook.) Decne. subsp. currorii
  • Hoodia currorii (Hook.) Decne. var. minor R.A.Dyer, accepted as Hoodia currorii (Hook.) Decne. subsp. currorii
  • Hoodia dinteri (A.Berger) Halda, accepted as Larryleachia marlothii (N.E.Br.) Plowes, indigenous
  • Hoodia dregei N.E.Br. endemic
  • Hoodia flava (N.E.Br.) Plowes, indigenous
  • Hoodia gibbosa Nel, accepted as Hoodia currorii (Hook.) Decne. subsp. currorii
  • Hoodia gordonii (Masson) Sweet ex Decne. indigenous
  • Hoodia husabensis Nel, accepted as Hoodia gordonii (Masson) Sweet ex Decne.
  • Hoodia langii Oberm. & Letty, accepted as Hoodia gordonii (Masson) Sweet ex Decne. present
  • Hoodia lugardii N.E.Br. accepted as Hoodia currorii (Hook.) Decne. subsp. lugardii (N.E.Br.) Bruyns
    • Hoodia macrantha Dinter, accepted as Hoodia currorii (Hook.) Decne. subsp. currorii
  • Hoodia montana Nel, accepted as Hoodia currorii (Hook.) Decne. subsp. currorii
  • Hoodia officinalis (N.E.Br.) Plowes, indigenous
    • Hoodia officinalis (N.E.Br.) Plowes subsp. officinalis, indigenous
  • Hoodia pilifera (L.f.) Plowes, indigenous
    • Hoodia pilifera (L.f.) Plowes subsp. annulata (N.E.Br.) Bruyns, endemic
    • Hoodia pilifera (L.f.) Plowes subsp. pilifera, endemic
    • Hoodia pilifera (L.f.) Plowes subsp. pillansii (N.E.Br.) Bruyns, accepted as Hoodia grandis (N.E.Br.) Plowes, endemic
  • Hoodia pillansii N.E.Br. accepted as Hoodia gordonii (Masson) Sweet ex Decne. present
  • Hoodia rosea Oberm. & Letty, accepted as Hoodia gordonii (Masson) Sweet ex Decne. present
  • Hoodia similis (N.E.Br.) Halda, accepted as Larryleachia cactiformis (Hook.) Plowes var. cactiformis, indigenous
  • Hoodia triebneri Schuldt, accepted as Hoodia triebneri (Nel) Bruyns
  • Hoodia whitesloaneana Dinter, accepted as Hoodia gordonii (Masson) Sweet ex Decne.

  • Huernia barbata (Masson) Haw. indigenous
    • Huernia barbata (Masson) Haw. subsp. barbata, indigenous
    • Huernia barbata (Masson) Haw. subsp. ingeae (Lavranos) Bruyns, endemic
    • Huernia barbata (Masson) Haw. var. griquensis N.E.Br. accepted as Huernia barbata (Masson) Haw. subsp. barbata, present
  • Huernia bayeri L.C.Leach, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels, endemic
  • Huernia blackbeardiae R.A.Dyer ex H.Jacobsen, accepted as Huernia zebrina N.E.Br. subsp. zebrina
  • Huernia blyderiverensis (L.C.Leach) Bruyns, endemic
  • Huernia brevirostris N.E.Br. accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels, present
    • Huernia brevirostris N.E.Br. subsp. baviaana L.C.Leach, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels, endemic
    • Huernia brevirostris N.E.Br. subsp. intermedia (N.E.Br.) L.C.Leach, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels, endemic
    • Huernia brevirostris N.E.Br. var. ecornuta (N.E.Br.) A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels, endemic
    • Huernia brevirostris N.E.Br. var. histrionica A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels var. thuretii, present
    • Huernia brevirostris N.E.Br. var. immaculata (N.E.Br.) A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels var. thuretii, present
    • Huernia brevirostris N.E.Br. var. intermedia N.E.Br. accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels var. thuretii, indigenous
    • Huernia brevirostris N.E.Br. var. longula (N.E.Br.) A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels var. thuretii, present
    • Huernia brevirostris N.E.Br. var. pallida (N.E.Br.) A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels var. thuretii, present
    • Huernia brevirostris N.E.Br. var. parvipuncta A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels var. thuretii, present
    • Huernia brevirostris N.E.Br. var. scabra (N.E.Br.) A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels var. thuretii, present
  • Huernia campanulata (Masson) Haw. accepted as Huernia barbata (Masson) Haw. subsp. barbata, endemic
    • Huernia campanulata (Masson) Haw. var. denticoronata N.E.Br. accepted as Huernia barbata (Masson) Haw. subsp. barbata, present
  • Huernia clavigera (Jacq.) Haw. accepted as Huernia barbata (Masson) Haw. subsp. barbata, endemic
    • Huernia clavigera (Jacq.) Haw. var. maritima N.E.Br. accepted as Huernia barbata (Masson) Haw. subsp. barbata, present
  • Huernia confusa E.Phillips, accepted as Huernia zebrina N.E.Br. subsp. insigniflora (C.A.Maass) Bruyns, indigenous
  • Huernia decemdentata N.E.Br. accepted as Huernia barbata (Masson) Haw. subsp. barbata, present
  • Huernia echidnopsioides (L.C.Leach) L.C.Leach, accepted as Huernia longii Pillans subsp. echidnopsioides (L.C.Leach) Bruyns, endemic
  • Huernia guttata (Masson) Haw. indigenous
    • Huernia guttata (Masson) Haw. subsp. calitzdorpensis L.C.Leach, accepted as Huernia guttata (Masson) Haw. subsp. guttata, endemic
    • Huernia guttata (Masson) Haw. subsp. guttata, endemic
    • Huernia guttata (Masson) Haw. subsp. reticulata (Masson) Bruyns, endemic
  • Huernia humilis (Masson) Haw. endemic
  • Huernia hystrix (Hook.f.) N.E.Br. indigenous
    • Huernia hystrix (Hook.f.) N.E.Br. subsp. hystrix, indigenous
    • Huernia hystrix (Hook.f.) N.E.Br. subsp. parvula (L.C.Leach) Bruyns, endemic
    • Huernia hystrix (Hook.f.) N.E.Br. var. parvula L.C.Leach, accepted as Huernia hystrix (Hook.f.) N.E.Br. subsp. parvula (L.C.Leach) Bruyns, endemic
  • Huernia ingeae Lavranos, accepted as Huernia barbata (Masson) Haw. subsp. ingeae (Lavranos) Bruyns, present
  • Huernia insigniflora C.A.Maass, accepted as Huernia zebrina N.E.Br. subsp. insigniflora (C.A.Maass) Bruyns, endemic
  • Huernia kennedyana Lavranos, endemic
  • Huernia kirkii N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Huernia loeseneriana Schltr. indigenous
  • Huernia longii Pillans, endemic
    • Huernia longii Pillans subsp. echidnopsioides (L.C.Leach) Bruyns, accepted as Huernia pillansii N.E.Br. subsp. echidnopsioides L.C.Leach, endemic
  • Huernia longii Pillans subsp. longii, endemic
  • Huernia longituba N.E.Br. indigenous
  • Huernia namaquensis Pillans, indigenous
  • Huernia nouhuysii I.Verd. endemic
  • Huernia ocellata (Jacq.) Schult. accepted as Huernia guttata (Masson) Haw. subsp. guttata, present
  • Huernia pendula E.A.Bruce, endemic
  • Huernia piersii N.E.Br. endemic
  • Huernia pillansii N.E.Br. endemic
    • Huernia pillansii N.E.Br. subsp. echidnopsioides L.C.Leach, accepted as Huernia echidnopsioides (L.C.Leach) L.C.Leach, indigenous
  • Huernia praestans N.E.Br. endemic
  • Huernia primulina N.E.Br. var. primulina, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels, present
    • Huernia primulina N.E.Br. var. rugosa N.E.Br. accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels var. thuretii, present
  • Huernia procumbens (R.A.Dyer) L.C.Leach, indigenous
  • Huernia quinta (E.Phillips) A.C.White & B.Sloane, indigenous
    • Huernia quinta (E.Phillips) A.C.White & B.Sloane var. blyderiverensis L.C.Leach, accepted as Huernia blyderiverensis (L.C.Leach) Bruyns, endemic
  • Huernia reticulata (Masson) Haw. accepted as Huernia guttata (Masson) Haw. subsp. reticulata (Masson) Bruyns, endemic
  • Huernia simplex N.E.Br. accepted as Huernia humilis (Masson) Haw. present
  • Huernia stapelioides Schltr. indigenous
  • Huernia thudichumii L.C.Leach, accepted as Huernia humilis (Masson) Haw. endemic
  • Huernia thuretii F.Cels, indigenous
    • Huernia thuretii F.Cels var. primulina (N.E.Br.) L.C.Leach, accepted as Huernia thuretii F.Cels, endemic
  • Huernia transvaalensis Stent, endemic
  • Huernia venusta (Masson) Haw. accepted as Huernia guttata (Masson) Haw. subsp. guttata, endemic
  • Huernia whitesloaneana Nel, endemic
  • Huernia witzenbergensis C.A.Luckh. endemic
  • Huernia x distincta N.E.Br. endemic
  • Huernia zebrina N.E.Br. indigenous
    • Huernia zebrina N.E.Br. subsp. insigniflora (C.A.Maass) Bruyns, endemic
    • Huernia zebrina N.E.Br. subsp. magniflora (E.Phillips) L.C.Leach, accepted as Huernia zebrina N.E.Br. subsp. zebrina, indigenous
    • Huernia zebrina N.E.Br. subsp. zebrina, indigenous
    • Huernia zebrina N.E.Br. var. magniflora E.Phillips, accepted as Huernia zebrina N.E.Br. subsp. zebrina, indigenous

  • Huerniopsis atrosanguinea (N.E.Br.) A.C.White & B.Sloane, accepted as Piaranthus atrosanguineus (N.E.Br.) Bruyns, present
  • Huerniopsis decipiens N.E.Br. accepted as Piaranthus decipiens (N.E.Br.) Bruyns, present
  • Huerniopsis gibbosa Nel, accepted as Piaranthus atrosanguineus (N.E.Br.) Bruyns

  • Ischnolepis natalensis (Schltr.) Venter, accepted as Petopentia natalensis (Schltr.) Bullock, endemic


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